A medical informatics perspective on health informatics 3.0. Findings from the yearbook 2011 section on health informatics 3.0

TitleA medical informatics perspective on health informatics 3.0. Findings from the yearbook 2011 section on health informatics 3.0
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsRuch, P
JournalYearb Med Inform
Volume6
Pagination30–32
Abstract

To summarize current advances of the so-called Web 3.0 and emerging trends of the semantic web.\\ We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2011, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of the today's and future activities in the field.\\ while the state of the research in the field is illustrated by a set of fairly heterogeneous studies, it is possible to identify significant clusters. While the most salient challenge and obsessional target of the semantic web remains its ambition to simply interconnect all available information, it is interesting to observe the developments of complementary research fields such as information sciences and text analytics. The combined expression power and virtually unlimited data aggregation skills of Web 3.0 technologies make it a disruptive instrument to discover new biomedical knowledge. In parallel, such an unprecedented situation creates new threats for patients participating in large-scale genetic studies as Wjst demonstrate how various data set can be coupled to re-identify anonymous genetic information.\\ The best paper selection of articles on decision support shows examples of excellent research on methods concerning original development of core semantic web techniques as well as transdisciplinary achievements as exemplified with literature-based analytics. This selected set of scientific investigations also demonstrates the needs for computerized applications to transform the biomedical data overflow into more operational clinical knowledge with potential threats for confidentiality directly associated with such advances. Altogether these papers support the idea that more elaborated computer tools, likely to combine heterogeneous text and data contents should soon emerge for the benefit of both experimentalists and hopefully clinicians.